It was with some surprise that I read Minister Ayanna Webster-Roy?s #lifeinleggings story: she was tormented by a Peeping Tom, and reporting it to police was like throwing bananas at chimps: it just excited them. Solution? Her husband beat up the Tom. Good for Mr Roy, and also lucky. The Tom could have had a weapon, and the police would do the same thing (nothing) had he used it on the gentleman.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

dolarve.com
And MIt was with some surprise that I read Minister Ayanna Webster-Roy?s #lifeinleggings story: she was tormented by a Peeping Tom, and reporting it to police was like throwing bananas at chimps: it just excited them.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.entornointeligente.com
Solution? Her husband beat up the Tom. Good for Mr Roy, and also lucky. The Tom could have had a weapon, and the police would do the same thing (nothing) had he used it on the gentleman.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.vediario.com
And Mr Roy could have been charged, by the same police, for acting when they failed to. Luckily it ended happily.

This tableau is connected (in my tortured personal web) to another big story: the banks, which seem, after years of robbing and brutalising clients with impunity, to be finally provoking a response.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

noticias-venezuela.com
By happy coincidence, I have a story which illustrates these two institutions working in tandem.

I?ve done business at a Maraval bank for the last two decades.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

enlasgradas.com
Up to a couple of years ago, all was as well as could be expected. But in 2014 I was standing in the bank, when I was accosted by a foreign person. Normally, my response would have been to, ah, defend myself. But I was then in the middle of a lengthy court matter, and painfully aware of how the justice and legal systems worked.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

dolarve.com
If I retaliated (even in self-defence) I knew I could be arrested. So I contented myself by motioning to the bank guard, who stood rock-still, like a troll watching volcano.

Had I done the accosting, I would?ve been dragged off in handcuffs, and customers and staff would have lined up to give evidence that I attacked an innocent foreign visitor (whose crazed looks and behaviour suggest that in his home country he would be in jail or heavily sedated).

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

noticias-venezuela.com
So I stood still, relying on the bank?s video cameras to record the story, and managed to remonstrate with the offender without fisticuffs, and he returned to his business.

I then asked the assistant manager if I could have the footage of the incident.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

mundinews.com
But bank policy on foreigners attacking locals is strange. Apparently they do everything they can to help foreign miscreants. No footage for me. I went to the St Clair Police Station, where a cop, initially reluctant to take the report, misspelled the name of the alleged perpetrator, and gave me a receipt which looked like it was written by a sleepy seven-year-old.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
(I have all documents, btw.)

After a few visits to the police station over the following weeks to enquire on the progress of the investigation, I finally met the officer on the street.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
No go, he said. The bank wouldn?t co-operate. Any attempt to question the alleged perp? Nope.

I thereafter called and wrote to the bank?s MD, quoting from the bank?s customer policy, and asking what the bank intended to do.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
Her response was surprising and effective: she ignored every letter, every call, every email. Finally, a clerk felt sorry for me and told me on the phone that they?d discussed it, decided the incident was my fault, and that since I had no legal standing, it was best to just ignore it.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
And the guard refused to speak to the police.

I called the banking ombudsman?s office, but the clerk actually giggled: ?We doesn? deal wid tings like dat.? I spoke to a lawyer, who told me the banks are masters at getting away with all sorts of ?grey area? incidents.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
Their attorneys would more than likely ignore any legal letter, and I?d end up paying their obscene costs if it got to court.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
I considered writing to the bank?s Head Office, but I did have a life and other things to do.

So game, set, match to the tag team of the bank and the TTPS.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
Crazy foreign guy remains live and at large. I haven?t stopped banking at that particular branch. To change banks would be a massive hassle for me, and would not affect that bank in the slightest. So I had to take it on the chin and move on. Until now, when I can use this space to name some names, perhaps cause some embarrassment, and who knows, maybe even precipitate some consequences.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
(For the public good, of course.)

It?s unlikely, though, that any of this will happen. The banks are shameless and recruit and train their staff accordingly. So I?ll just have to comfort myself with the fact that it?s out there, and I get to tell the banks publicly that they?re the financial equivalent of extortionist-pimps the public has no choice but to deal with.

As for the TTPS, well, fellers, David West had it right: you?re just a gang, and not even a good one.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

www.google.com
With cops like you, criminals are starting to work half-days. Wife-beaters and perverts are forming police appreciation chapters.

And here?s a note to the Commissioner: I am going to emulate the husband of the Honourable Minister Webster-Roy.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

xn--elpaisdeespaa-tkb.com
The next time an incident occurs, I now know the police are not there to protect or serve. I will therefore take the steps to protect myself. (So, Crazy Foreign Person?who?s here because you can get away with things in T&T that would get you arrested at home?see you around.)

I?m also curious as to the bank?s response to this.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

eluniversalnews.com
Will I be asked to remove my accounts? Will my cheques and funds suddenly be frozen inexplicably? Keep reading the Guardian to find out.r Roy could have been charged, by the same police, for acting when they failed to.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

Luckily it ended happily. This tableau is connected (in my tortured personal web) to another big story: the banks, which seem, after years of robbing and brutalising clients with impunity, to be finally provoking a response.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

By happy coincidence, I have a story which illustrates these two institutions working in tandem. I?ve done business at a Maraval bank for the last two decades. Up to a couple of years ago, all was as well as could be expected. But in 2014 I was standing in the bank, when I was accosted by a foreign person. Normally, my response would have been to, ah, defend myself. But I was then in the middle of a lengthy court matter, and painfully aware of how the justice and legal systems worked.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

If I retaliated (even in self-defence) I knew I could be arrested. So I contented myself by motioning to the bank guard, who stood rock-still, like a troll watching volcano.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

Had I done the accosting, I would?ve been dragged off in handcuffs, and customers and staff would have lined up to give evidence that I attacked an innocent foreign visitor (whose crazed looks and behaviour suggest that in his home country he would be in jail or heavily sedated).

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

So I stood still, relying on the bank?s video cameras to record the story, and managed to remonstrate with the offender without fisticuffs, and he returned to his business.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

I then asked the assistant manager if I could have the footage of the incident. But bank policy on foreigners attacking locals is strange. Apparently they do everything they can to help foreign miscreants. No footage for me. I went to the St Clair Police Station, where a cop, initially reluctant to take the report, misspelled the name of the alleged perpetrator, and gave me a receipt which looked like it was written by a sleepy seven-year-old.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

(I have all documents, btw.) After a few visits to the police station over the following weeks to enquire on the progress of the investigation, I finally met the officer on the street.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

No go, he said. The bank wouldn?t co-operate. Any attempt to question the alleged perp? Nope. I thereafter called and wrote to the bank?s MD, quoting from the bank?s customer policy, and asking what the bank intended to do.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

Her response was surprising and effective: she ignored every letter, every call, every email. Finally, a clerk felt sorry for me and told me on the phone that they?d discussed it, decided the incident was my fault, and that since I had no legal standing, it was best to just ignore it.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

And the guard refused to speak to the police. I called the banking ombudsman?s office, but the clerk actually giggled: ?We doesn? deal wid tings like dat.? I spoke to a lawyer, who told me the banks are masters at getting away with all sorts of ?grey area? incidents.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

Their attorneys would more than likely ignore any legal letter, and I?d end up paying their obscene costs if it got to court.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

I considered writing to the bank?s Head Office, but I did have a life and other things to do. So game, set, match to the tag team of the bank and the TTPS. Crazy foreign guy remains live and at large. I haven?t stopped banking at that particular branch. To change banks would be a massive hassle for me, and would not affect that bank in the slightest. So I had to take it on the chin and move on. Until now, when I can use this space to name some names, perhaps cause some embarrassment, and who knows, maybe even precipitate some consequences.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

(For the public good, of course.) It?s unlikely, though, that any of this will happen. The banks are shameless and recruit and train their staff accordingly. So I?ll just have to comfort myself with the fact that it?s out there, and I get to tell the banks publicly that they?re the financial equivalent of extortionist-pimps the public has no choice but to deal with.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

As for the TTPS, well, fellers, David West had it right: you?re just a gang, and not even a good one. With cops like you, criminals are starting to work half-days. Wife-beaters and perverts are forming police appreciation chapters. And here?s a note to the Commissioner: I am going to emulate the husband of the Honourable Minister Webster-Roy.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

The next time an incident occurs, I now know the police are not there to protect or serve. I will therefore take the steps to protect myself. (So, Crazy Foreign Person?who?s here because you can get away with things in T&T that would get you arrested at home?see you around.) I?m also curious as to the bank?s response to this.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

Will I be asked to remove my accounts? Will my cheques and funds suddenly be frozen inexplicably? Keep reading the Guardian to find out.

.

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

© Tomás Elías González

© Tomás Elías González Benitez

© Tomás González

Tags: attack